CS371p Spring 2022: Week 7

CS371p Spring 2022: Week 7

  1. What did you do this past week? On Monday, we talked about how important it is to catch exceptions by reference, and not by value or address, because it prevents making another copy of the exception and we also have access to all the data. On Wednesday, we went over the semantics of arrays vs. pointers. On Friday, we went through an example of how to write an equal() method using pointers.
  2. What’s in your way? Since the next project hasn’t been released yet, nothing’s in my way for this class.
  3. What will you do next week? I’ll go to class and prepare for the quizzes as I do normally. I’ll also keep an eye out for the next project.
  4. What did you think of Paper #7: Liskov Substitution Principle? It was nice to see how it also connected to the Open-Closed Principle, which is the paper that we read last week. The designing processes for classes can require lots of thought and be quite difficult, but if you take your time and be careful with it, your code will be a lot better as a result, and prevent errors down the road.
  5. What was your experience of consts, arrays, and equal? I definitely appreciated the bit of review of consts at the beginning of the week, since I was confused about that last week. As for arrays, I already had some idea that they were very similar to pointers, since I remember using similar syntax for my computer architecture and operating systems projects, but it was a good review. I thought equal was a great way to wrap up all of the knowledge together into a tangible example. I hope that I’ll be able to remember all of the knowledge we learned and apply it in case we have to do any HackerRank exercises next week.
  6. What made you happy this week? I went bouldering at Greg Gym with a few more people that I haven’t really climbed with, and it was really fun! We also played racquetball afterwards, which I haven’t touched since freshman year, so I forgot how enjoyable it could be.
  7. What’s your pick-of-the-week or tip-of-the-week? In my graphics class, our current project is to add code to a web application that displays a fractal called a Menger Sponge and to also do some shader programming. A graphics shader is essentially a program that renders the light and color of each pixel. In class, our TA showed us this website called shadertoy.com that showcases some really cool shaders that people have made. It’s really amazing how some code and equations can generate images that look super realistic.

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